Detective Comics #1000

Detective Comics #1000

It’s somewhat crazy to see this issue finally hit shelves. Every month around the time we order comics I’ve been mentioning the slow approach of this landmark issue and just like Action Comics with Superman there’s a lot of anticipation around this comic. Similar again to Action Comics, Detective #1000 went the tribute route by making a near 100 page collection of multiple short stories by well known writers and artists throughout Batman’s long comic book life. While that basically means you’re sitting down to read three comic books worth of material, the names floating around in this comic are well worth the time to check out. With Snyder and Capullo headlining the comic, they’re already putting themselves in a winning position.

Detective 1000 clearly focuses around telling stories of all shapes and sizes within the Bat universe. Snyder’s story is emotional and meaningful with character driven elements as they always seem to be. Paul Dini’s story revolves around Harley Quinn and much of the silliness around Batman’s rogues gallery. Further stories focus on the Bat’s combat prowess or his unbeaten detective skills. Darker story elements appear in some while lighter appear in others. The entirety of the comic really displays Batman’s potential in storytelling diversity. It’s also why so many different writers have succeeded with the title throughout the years writing in very different ways. The Patrick Gleason comic book of Batman & Robin for example, was an extremely different story in both theme and style than Snyder’s Batman which ran parallel. The multiple ways writers can succeed with Batman and the world around him is really displayed here, even more so than Superman’s #1000 issue was, who often gets criticism for his lack of good storytelling.

Though none of the stories directly relate back to the current continuity with Tom King’s run with Batman or the Detective Comic’s team, fans of Batman’s history and the character itself will find stories worth reading here. This is really just a celebration of Batman over anything else, and thus #1000 becomes a trophy issue. If you’re not interested in that, it’s probably not worth the extra $ you’ll have to spend to pick this up. That being said, this comic is by no means half-assed, and those that have put their time and effort into both this single comic book and Batman as a whole in the past 80 years truly love this character, and that show’s here, which is important in and of itself.


5 out of 5 stars (5 / 5)

Vader: Dark Visions #1

Vader: Dark Visions #1

Finding the next proper comic book for Vader this past year or two has been a controversial task. With multiple series cancellations and ideas shifting around all over the place at Marvel, I questioned the validity of any Star Wars comic announcement until it finally arrived on shelves. Dark Visions promises to be a unique look into Vader and the people his mercilessness crosses paths with. The primary aspect that made the most recent run of Vader so good (in addition to great writing and art), was the time period it took place. Young Vader between episode 3 and 4 was untouched territory in the current canon, and it really shined, especially with the other comic’s focus on the period between 4 and 5. Dark Visions however seems to jump back to a much more familiar time with Vader, and that means writers can’t rely on the freshness of its setting and its mood. Dark Visions is going to have to be impressive all on its lonesome, and as always I’m a little skeptical, but ready to see it succeed.

Dark Visions #1 is narrated through the eyes of a young citizen of a fairly low-tech civilization. Their people have obviously been affected by the raging war between the Empire and the Rebellion, but they know little of it. Wars wage above them in the upper atmosphere of the planet. Dog fights and blockades ensue. Our narrator watches intently, despite being called to evacuate by the rest of his village and it isn’t until Darth Vader makes an emergency landing planetside that the young observer begins to regret his decision to stick around. As the menacing dark lord of the Sith steps out of the cockpit of his Tie Fighter, the boy knows he’s way in over his head.

Like many characters, specifically villains, Vader works best as a mysterious figure. You can’t write a Darth Vader comic from the perspective of Vader. It simply doesn’t work. He’s a quiet, dangerous, and unpredictable killing machine. To dive into the mind of Darth Vader would be unfitting for the aura of unsettling mystery that Vader gives off. To see that this comic book was indeed written from a completely outside perspective, through the eyes of a completely new and disposable character is a clever choice. We’re not dedicated to this new person, and through their insignificance, we begin to understand the sheer power that Vader’s presence demands, and that’s really cool. Considering Dark Visions is a 5 issue series, I have to gripe on this comic’s lack of actually getting anywhere. I do love seeing Vader well drawn, which he is in this comic, but Dark Visions has yet to provide something about the Sith Lord that I haven’t seen before. Hopefully issues going forward can get the ball rolling, because if they can’t, it’s going to be a slow 5 issues.

3 out of 5 stars (3 / 5)
General Grievous #1

General Grievous #1

My hiatus from the Age of the Republic anthology series was never going to last. I won’t lie to you, I did get a little tired of reviewing them week after week, so I took a little break, but I was so eager to see and talk about this comic book specifically, figuring I could skip reviewing Padme. She’s an interesting enough character when written properly, but Grievous in concept is a really cool character. On top of that, Age of the Republic’s more mundane and psychological approach to storytelling might be challenged with a character like Grievous who has been shown in recent memory to be a somewhat two-dimensional character: bad dude with 4 lightsabers. That being said, originally Grievous was an extremely powerful badass with a mysterious backstory. This comic could go either direction with him, and having absolutely no idea where or when Grievous #1 takes place makes me eager to see what kind of route they take this coughing cyborg separatist who’s always had a soft spot in my heart.

Grievous #1 follows the mechanical menace hunting Jedi deep in the jungle world of Ledeve which is, as far as I know, a new planet in the Star Wars universe. We get to see a very old Clone Wars-esque Grievous here, proving to be an unbeatable monster by mercilessly and easily striking down the Jedi in his path with their own weapons. His goal: a Jedi temple hidden away among the trees on this planet. While it remains a bit of a mystery what exactly he’s after besides the utter destruction of ancient Jedi remnants we do get to see his arsenal of built-in tools and abilities that make him such a force to be reckoned with. Despite booby traps and various other means of keeping intruders out of the temple, Grievous simply can’t be stopped with his mechanical body ready to climb any walls or make any jump. When confronted by an ancient force spirit however he’ll be stopped in his tracks and put to the test. Little does this entity know, Grievous has the entire Separatist army on its back door.

There’s a couple of really awesome things worth mentioning about General Grievous #1. The writer finds a perfect balance between the Clone Wars Grievous from 2003 (the overpowered Jedi killer widely considered to be the best iteration of the character) and the actual movie Grievous who’s much more politically focused and cowardly. It’s incredibly refreshing to see Grievous in his old form again completely destroying Jedi and claiming his vast superiority despite not being able to use the Force. That being said, the writer makes a couple of really great choices I won’t spoil that will likely remind you of the movie version of the character, and it manages to be equally awesome. The creative team here managed to provide such fine amount of fan service while keeping the character real, and that’s really respectable. Additionally somehow this comic still manages to follow a lot of the same themes that Age of the Republic has been following. The spiritual side of the Force makes yet another appearance in this comic albeit feeling a little forced. I still dig it. This comic is awesome. It feels like a tease and a taste of what a General Grievous comic series could be when written correctly, and I really want it. It’s way, way too short though. Can’t have it all I guess.

5 out of 5 stars (5 / 5)
Ronin Island #1

Ronin Island #1

  For a couple of years now I’ve widely considered Boom! Studios to be among the best in the comic book world. Stories like Diesel and Mech Cadet Yu are some of my absolute favorite comic reading experiences, but the major downside to Boom! unlike the big three of DC, Marvel and Image is their lack of quantity. Most Boom! comics aren’t my style and on top of that, the sheer amount of comics they’re putting out just isn’t that high, so comics I love coming out of this company are few and far between. It does however, create more personal hype when a comic like this new Ronan Island miniseries gets announced by the same writer as Mech Cadet Yu. A Feudal Japan storyline in Booms!’ recognizable art style is a total dream come true, so naturally I was instantly on board. I held high hopes for Ronan Island going in, as everyone deserves at least one good wholesome Boom! Studios comic in their life.

The exact location of Ronin Island is a bit of a mystery, but one thing becomes quickly clear: the world has been laid waste to by the Great Wind, which sounds like a massive world-scale war, or perhaps a natural disaster of epic proportions. Regardless, the world has been scattered and ruined, and Ronin Island houses some of the last remnants of tradition and people from Japan, China, and Korea all living together. With a little effort, they’re able to maintain their differences and cultures while also growing together as a single people. Our two main characters: Kenichi and Hana are very different from each other. Kenichi is, I assume Japanese. He comes from a line of Samurai in a wealthy traditionalist family. Hana is an orphaned Korean, who spent her younger years doing farm work. Both are tested in this first issue to prove their worth as warriors of their people and protectors of the island, though their testing is quickly interrupted by an invader: a self proclaimed Shogun who seeks their integration back into the mainland. Doubtful of mainland’s resurgence after the Great Wind, the island’s elders are forced to make a choice: parley with this new foreign entity, or send him back to where he came from and refuse the deal.

  There are a few things worth mentioning about Ronin Island, specifically the art style which breaks away just enough from the Boom! norm to look unique while still fitting loosely into that mold. The concept of Ronin Island and its lore that’s set up in this comic is surprisingly well handled despite its lack of text heavy pages. Much of the story is learned through making inferences through the light dialogue, and with a story as simple as Ronin Island I think that’s the best way to handle it. The main characters aren’t exactly award-winningly interesting, but it’s still early in the comic, and much of this first issue focuses on world building rather than deep-diving into the two mc’s. The dynamic between the two is likely what’ll draw your attention, and I think Pak handles their few moments together so far pretty admirably. I have no idea where this comic is really going by the end of it, but it’s art and its world building was good enough to draw me back in, so I look forward to the next 4 issues here, hopefully continuing the same trend.

4 out of 5 stars (4 / 5)
Young Justice #1

Young Justice #1

  I know I’m a little (lotta) late to the party on this one, but I think this comic deserves some of my attention. I’ve always been a big fan of the young superhero teams in the DC comicsverse. I’ve always found them to be far superior to Marvel’s, and I think that’s part in due to the god level animated television shows that DC was consistently putting out in the late 90’s and 2000’s. Young Justice, Teen Titans, Titans, etc. have all had their miracle runs over the years, and I think there’s a ton of characters on these teams that we remember fondly and always return to. People in their 20s and 30s grew up watching/reading Teen Titans and Young Justice so I think the younger audience is always ready for more of that young adult comic book content. I’ve always been a Robin fanboy myself, so seeing characters like Dick and Tim return to the teams they were so renowned for during the turn of the century is genuinely exciting. I do have some reservations about Bendis, who’s spearheading this ‘Wonder Comics’ line featuring the younger generations of DC heroes, but Gleason, the new YJ artist, is perhaps my favorite artist of all time, so I was ready to finally jump in and see what the new series had to offer.

Young Justice #1 follows the reforging of the team with a couple of new faces and some very familiar ones. There’s a bit of spoilery in the lineup, so I’ll avoid any names, but the cover will obviously give you a decent idea. An alien invasion by a group of Gem soldiers from Gemworld, an old DC universe that I don’t think has really made an appearance since the 20th century is good cause for the Young Justice team to meet up. It’s unclear why they’re all in the same place at the same time, or what really even sparked the return of some of the characters otherwise forgotten by the New 52 continuity reboot, but they’re here and they’re teaming up once again to put a stop to these evil-doers. What better than an invasion of low tier enemies for a team’s introduction comic to clean up, ey? In natural DC style, the various heroes new and old seem to easily defeat the Gems in question, but as Robin unintentionally learns, there’s more to this invasion than a simple declaration of war and a petty attempt to conquer the planet, so it seems there’s development to come with this Gemworld callback. Robin has no choice but to reforge the previously broken team and tackle this new threat.

It’s very unclear whether Bendis was supposed to keep this comic book in continuity or not. It seems like a very loose yes, and I’m not sure how I feel about that in general. While I do think DC was trying too hard during the New 52 era to keep everything strictly in line with their new continuity, Bendis also shouldn’t be allowed to retcon and shrug off everything that doesn’t fit his vision. Apparently, that’s Bendis’ style, so I suppose it’s time to get used to it. Regardless, the writing felt littered with plot holes at times, and it kind of felt like we’re expected to just not question anything and enjoy the comic. I personally think that’s lame Writers should find a balance between playfully ignoring continuity problems and adhering to them. I’m not sure bendis is doing that here. Story and decision making aside though, it’s the characters and Gleason’s art that really carry this comic book to the level that it’s at. Individually the members of the Young Justice team are still really enjoyable, and there’s some great throwback moments to the old days. Gleason’s vibrant and almost childish art style has some grittier style to it here, and as always, it’s unbearably good. My reservations remain about Bendis even now. There’s a reason he left Marvel with a questionable reputation, however, I’m completely willing to give him the benefit of the doubt for now. I look forward to seeing him hopefully prove naysayers wrong. With a comic like Young Justice, he better not prove them right.

4 out of 5 stars (4 / 5)
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